Sports & Outdoor Actvities

 

From hiking, biking, fishing and hunting, to water activities or hot air ballooning, we have options for everyone who enjoys the outdoors.

Governor Michelle Lujan Grisham signed New Mexico’s Outdoor Recreation Division into law on April 2, 2019. New Mexico recognizes Outdoor initiatives are a powerful engine to grow wealth and job opportunities in New Mexico. Written into the law was the first-ever Outdoor Equity Fund, a grant intended to help disadvantaged youth get outside.

“When we create a focused office to both attract new businesses and boost existing concerns, we will plant our flag alongside Colorado, Montana, Utah and others—and indeed we have the potential to surpass them,” Lujan Grisham said when the bill passed the Senate. “With this targeted investment, we can and will attract more young adults who emphasize the outdoors in where they choose to live; we will provide important new opportunities to disadvantaged youth through the first-of-its-kind equity fund; and we will expand the economic reach of this industry to all corners of this state.”


 

Jemez Historic Site

Business Information

18160 NM-4
Jemez Springs 87025
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Description

A short drive from Albuquerque and Bernalillo, the Jemez National Historic Landmark is one of the most beautiful prehistoric and historic sites in the Southwest. It includes the stone ruins of a 500 year old Indian village and the San José de los Jemez church dating to 1621/2. The village of Giusewa was built in the narrow San Diego Canyon by the ancestors of the present-day people of Jemez (Walatowa) Pueblo. The name Giusewa refers to the natural springs in the area.In the 17th century, the Spanish established a Catholic mission at the village. The mission was short-lived, and, in time, the people abandoned the site and moved to the current location of Jemez Pueblo. The massive stonewalls were constructed about the same time the Pilgrims landed at Plymouth Rock. The heritage center contains exhibitions that tell the story of the site through the words of the Jemez people. A 1,400-foot interpretive trail winds through the impressive site ruins.